brand

Working with Colour

After reading this article. (Summary: Brands should utilise colour more to attract customers and to stay fresh & unique.)

I was inspired to write about my experience of working almost exclusively with a colourful brand. The Sharp Project‘s branding was designed by Malcolm Garrett of [images.co.uk], who I worked with closely on the re-design of The Sharp Project’s new brochure for 2013 as brand consultant.

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This made me realise how the colour of the brand is inherent in the building, it’s identity and also from a practical sense – all the colours apply to different areas of the building (which all serve different purposes) and are used in the way-finding graphics and colour schemes which contribute to The Sharp Project’s uniqueness.

 photo wayfindi-tsp_zps9caf93e7.jpgWorking with the brand is a bit of a double-edged sword; as on the one hand it’s nice and useful to have the variation in colour – meaning I have different attributes to draw upon and have more freedom with my designs whilst still staying within the boundaries of the brand guidelines.

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It also means that depending on the nature of the design and where/how/what it’ll be used for dictates the colours I use e.g. If we have an event in The Campus, the colours I’ll use are gold, orange and grey…

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However on the other hand it can be a challenge in that the logo has to always feature atop a white background or this fairly neutral green/grey colour [#dce2de], which can sometimes be limiting when designing a promotional piece or if using it alongside other branding. But in terms of versatility it’s very good to work with, and can be varied using a combination of the lettering and/or roundel.

I’m looking forward to working with Malcolm Garrett on future brand work for The Sharp Project, SharpFutures and beyond.

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